Interference

Discussion in 'iPhone 7' started by ultra1984, Oct 15, 2017.

  1. brixtonboy

    brixtonboy Well-Known Member

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    According to iputz now you have put the phone in Airplane mode and it stopped you should know what to do ????
    I think we both need help here, l haven’t got a clue what to do.
    No doubt when he comes back online he will have the answer
     
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  2. ultra1984

    ultra1984 New Member

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    Thank you. I hope so.
     
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  3. brixtonboy

    brixtonboy Well-Known Member

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    Ps. I almost a pensioner to, over the ocean far away.
     
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  4. ultra1984

    ultra1984 New Member

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    :):):):(
     
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  5. 933

    933 Well-Known Member

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    Look up ferrite chokes.
    Read this and look into getting some of these. IMG_3172.JPG IMG_3171.JPG
    Again, read up about ferrite chokes, and what they do. And you will most likely need snap on ferrite chokes for what you will be using them for.
     
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  6. brixtonboy

    brixtonboy Well-Known Member

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    how and in which way should they be used in this situation?
     
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  7. 933

    933 Well-Known Member

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    Placed on every coax cable or wiring that has the interference. Wrap the ferrite choke around the wire as many times as possible. Place the chokes on the coax for the cable box and also on any plug wire that is being affected. These things do work, I’ve used them not only to rid of RFI/TVI issues with not only my TVs and computers but also my neighbors as well with issues related to ham radio station causing issues at their place. Again. It’s a good idea to read up on how and why to use ferrite chokes and how they work. You can get them off eBay, Amazon, and many other places if you look around.
    Here is some more info on ferrite chokes.
    Here is a good article.

    Using Ferrite Chokes to Suppress Cellular RFI from Your Wireless System


    Example of typical small- and large-diameter ferrite cores
    Example of typical small- and large-diameter ferrite cores
    You’ve heard it before. Under the right (or wrong) circumstances, some types of cellular phones are capable of interacting with audio equipment and causing audible interference. Since the first GSM-type mobile networks went up, the alien clicks and buzzes (sometimes known as “Blackberry buzz”) have terrorized audio professionals everywhere. I’m sure you know the characteristic blip-blip-blip bzzzzzzz all too well.
    The problem isn’t as bad as it once was, because GSM phones, whose handsets are largely responsible for Blackberry buzz, are being displaced by LTE/CDMA models in many countries, but it still happens.
    Dispelling Myths About Interference
    I’d like to address the confusion around this type of troublesome interference, and introduce a simple, inexpensive device called the ferrite choke that can be used to stop it.
    Many wireless audio users erroneously attribute Blackberry buzz to cell phones being “on my frequency.” In fact, active cellular networks are hundreds of megahertz away from the top of the UHF band and cannot directly interfere with wireless microphone receivers, whose front-ends are well equipped to defend against them.
    A ferrite core can be especially effective when used with small diameter cables, such as those use on lavaliere mics or comm headset cords, which can be susceptible to RFI interference
    A ferrite core can be especially effective when used with small diameter cables, such as those use on lavaliere mics or comm headset cords, which can be susceptible to RFI interference
    Rather, Blackberry buzz is caused by GSM handsets initiating communication using pulsed data bursts, which inadvertently and adversely interact with electronic components found inside a wide variety of audio equipment — and not just wireless mics. If the rapid on/off signaling between phone and base station is able to enter the signal pathway of an audio system, it can be rectified by non-linear components — usually amplifiers — and create false voltages at audio frequencies, which are converted into audio later on by speakers (Note: I must acknowledge Henry Cohen of CP Communications for helping to confirm this.)
    An Ounce of Prevention
    You can prevent Blackberry buzz in three ways: Turn off cellphones, keep active cellphones a safe distance away from audio equipment or physically prevent radio frequency energy from entering devices.
    The first two are obvious and easy enough, but the ubiquity of cellular and smartphones makes it difficult to exclude cellphones from everywhere audio equipment is used.
    Usually, electronics keep ambient radio frequency energy out through shielding and filtering. But even on a well-designed piece of gear, there are opportunities for electromagnetic infiltration.
    The most common entry point is a length of unshielded, poorly shielded or damaged cable, like a lavalier mic or intercom headset cord, which acts as an antenna. XLR cables can also unintentionally conduct radio waves and leak them into a system via a loophole called the Shield-Current Induced Noise (SCIN) effect.
    Enter the Ferrite Choke
    Typical placement of ferrite core around small-diameter cable. Note small piece of gaff tape wrapped around cable for a more snug fit to keep the core from sliding around
    Typical placement of ferrite core around small-diameter cable. Note small piece of gaff tape wrapped around cable for a more snug fit to keep the core from sliding around
    Ferrite chokes are passive devices that selectively block or dissipate high frequencies traveling through a cable. You might think of them like electrical toll booths, allowing audio frequencies to pass through while keeping radio frequencies out. There are lots of different kinds of ferrite chokes, some of which are expensive, finicky, hard to install and poorly suited for suppressing GSM frequencies, which may be as high as 1,800 MHz.
     
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  8. 933

    933 Well-Known Member

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    This is just some material on the issue. There is lots more that explain how RF energy affects TV’s, Computers, and pretty well any electrical device it can.
     
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  9. ultra1984

    ultra1984 New Member

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    Thank you for all your help. I did look it up but I have no idea where to put these things. Totally at a loss. Again thank you.
     
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  10. 933

    933 Well-Known Member

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    Place them at the cable box on the coax. Same for computers, place them on the power cord, the cable for monitor, and so on. If you read up on them more you’ll find how to use the ones I posted. And they will most likely rid you of all your RF noise issues. If you need more help, PM me and I’ll be glad to show you a pic or 2 of how they get installed onto cables and coax for cable tv. Anyhow, good luck with whatever you do and hope you get it resolved. May want to look into some better shielded cables and also cable tv coax that is well shielded. Good day.
     
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  11. brixtonboy

    brixtonboy Well-Known Member

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    Please don’t misunderstand me. So far from memory 2 different model iPhones. 2 different data suppliers.
    2 different model motor cars.

    If Airplane mode is off the problem goes away.
    This was suggested by iputz but they have not come back online yet.
    I would recommend if possible she finds a friend with the same data company and brings them home
    iPhone or Android.

    If the house has a problem with radio transmissions and stuff why is it not being effected by the other iPhones in the house?? She has after all 2 tried.
    Wrapping the house in cables is not the answer in my opinion. But what do l know
     
  12. ultra1984

    ultra1984 New Member

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    My Grandaughter who lives with us has the same provider and has a I-phone 5s. I think I will have to ban my daughter from the house. :)
     
  13. brixtonboy

    brixtonboy Well-Known Member

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    If the phone is simply sitting on a table, what then ?

    Pm sent.
     
  14. ultra1984

    ultra1984 New Member

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    It's okay until she receives a txt or e-mail or a call. If she sends any it's the same.
     
  15. brixtonboy

    brixtonboy Well-Known Member

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    Have you read the PM l sent you
     

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