Apple iPhone 4 orders are shipping!

Discussion in 'Apple & iPhone News' started by iDan, Jun 19, 2010.

  1. iDan

    iDan Administrator Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    At last, the iPhone 4s are SHIPPING! Members of iPhone4Forum.net are now receiving emails from Apple indicating iPhone 4 orders have shipped. The email includes a FedEx tracking number and the delivery date is showing up as June 23rd, one day before Apple's announced release date. Most likely the orders will be held at the warehouse and delivered on June 24th. Who thinks June 24th should be a holiday, so we can all take off from work and enjoy our new devices?!

    Thanks for the tip Rag1247!

    Check out the discussion already in progress: http://www.iphone4forum.net/forum/iphone-4-12/iphone-4-shipped-235/
     
  2. DannyBoy

    DannyBoy New Member

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    Im TOTALLY taking thursday off!!! LOL
     
  3. DannyBoy

    DannyBoy New Member

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    Well some tracking info is on the FedEx site now and as expected...estimated delivery is the 24th.....sorry guys if it was my guess no early delivery unless you have a confused driver..lol
     
  4. Gregoris

    Gregoris Administrator Staff Member

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    lol you know it, so every one uses their phone straight away no time to charge? i thought it was bad for battery to do that?
     
  5. DannyBoy

    DannyBoy New Member

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    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]
    How to prolong lithium-based batteries


    Battery research is focusing heavily on lithium chemistries, so much so that one could presume that all portable devices will be powered with lithium-ion batteries in the future. In many ways, lithium-ion is superior to nickel and lead-based chemistries and the applications for lithium-ion batteries are growing as a result.

    Lithium-ion has not yet fully matured and is being improved continuously. New metal and chemical combinations are being tried every six months to increase energy density and prolong service life. The improvements in longevity after each change will not be known for a few years.

    A lithium-ion battery provides 300-500 discharge/charge cycles. The battery prefers a partial rather than a full discharge. Frequent full discharges should be avoided when possible. Instead, charge the battery more often or use a larger battery. There is no concern of memory when applying unscheduled charges.

    Although lithium-ion is memory-free in terms of performance deterioration, batteries with fuel gauges exhibit what engineers refer to as "digital memory". Here is the reason: Short discharges with subsequent recharges do not provide the periodic calibration needed to synchronize the fuel gauge with the battery's state-of-charge. A deliberate full discharge and recharge every 30 charges corrects this problem. Letting the battery run down to the cut-off point in the equipment will do this. If ignored, the fuel gauge will become increasingly less accurate. (Read more in 'Choosing the right battery for portable computing', Part Two.)

    Aging of lithium-ion is an issue that is often ignored. A lithium-ion battery in use typically lasts between 2-3 years. The capacity loss manifests itself in increased internal resistance caused by oxidation. Eventually, the cell resistance reaches a point where the pack can no longer deliver the stored energy although the battery may still have ample charge. For this reason, an aged battery can be kept longer in applications that draw low current as opposed to a function that demands heavy loads. Increasing internal resistance with cycle life and age is typical for cobalt-based lithium-ion, a system that is used for cell phones, cameras and laptops because of high energy density. The lower energy dense manganese-based lithium-ion, also known as spinel, maintains the internal resistance through its life but loses capacity due to chemical decompositions. Spinel is primarily used for power tools.
    [/FONT]
     
  6. Gregoris

    Gregoris Administrator Staff Member

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    so basically never fully charge your phone, and its better to charge it more then fully charge all the time
     
  7. DannyBoy

    DannyBoy New Member

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    A full charge is good. Just limit you full discharges. Any iPhone i have ever bought has always come partially charged so i dont see any reason to not use it out of the box as long as its plugged in and your not going to run it dead right out of the box. Now that is just my opinion...I know there are others that rather the full charge. I think what really confuses most is older NON li-Ion batterys DID require a full charge/discharge to retain battery life.
     
  8. Gregoris

    Gregoris Administrator Staff Member

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    i dont think i would be able to put it down when i start using it lol i would be using it hours non stop
     

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